Zealot

1 capitalized: a member of a fanatical sect arising in Judea from the first century A.D. and militantly opposing the Roman domination of Palestine
2: a person who has very strong feelings about something (such as religion or politics) and wants other people to have those same feelings

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Zealot (n.): early 14th century, “member of a militant 1st century Jewish sect which fiercely resisted the Romans in Palestine,” from Late Latin zelotes, from Greek zelotesone who is a zealous follower,” from zelounto be zealous,” from zeloszeal.” Extended sense of “a fanatical enthusiast” first recorded 1630s (earlier in this sense was zelator, mid-15c.).

Zeal (n.): “passionate ardor in pursuit of an objective or course of action,” late 14th century, from Old French zel (Modern French zèle) and directly from Late Latin zeluszeal, emulation” (source also of Italian zelo, Spanish celo), a Church word, from Greek zelosardor, eager rivalry, emulation,” “a noble passion” [Liddell & Scott], but also “jealousy;” prom Proto-Indo-European ya-to seek, request, desire.” From mid-15th century as “devotion.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Everyone and everything needed to be raised to its highest level – the teacher must become a mage, the husband a knight errant, the labor a hero in a sacred drama – intensified, rarefied, baptized in the turbulent waters of restlessness, curiosity, and ardor.”

Philip Zaleski (author and editor of several books on religion and spirituality, including “The Recollected Heart,” “The Bendictines of Petersham,” and “Gifts of the Spirit.”)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philip_Zaleski

“My candle burns at both ends;
It will not last the night;
But ah, my foes, and oh, my friends—
It gives a lovely light!”

Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950, Pulitzer Prize-winner and one of the most successful and respected poets in America, noted for her dramatic works, including “Aria de capo, “The Lamp and the Bell”)

Bio Source:

www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/edna-st-vincent-millay

“You can get a lot of work done if you stay with it and are excited and its play instead of work.”

Joseph Campbell (1904-1987, mythologist, writer, editor, and teacher who work examined the universality of recurring myths in human culture, wrote more than 40 books including, “The Hero With a Thousand Faces” and “Masks of God”)

Bio Source:

billmoyers.com/guest/joseph-campbell/

“We all tend to make zealous judgment, and thereby close ourselves off from revelation.”

Madeleine L’Engle (1918-2007, American writer of young-adult fiction, particularly the Newberry Medal-winning, “A Wrinkle in Time”)

Bio Source:

www.madeleinelengle.com/madeleine-lengle/

“You know your Bible too well and life too little.”

Richard Llewellyn (1906-1983, Richard Dafydd Vivian Llewellyn Lloyd, Welsh novelist and playwright, best known for “How Green Was My Valley,” a novel about a Welsh mining family)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Richard-Llewellyn

Meditation

“Everyone and everything needed to be raised to its highest level – the teacher must become a mage, the husband a knight errant, the labor a hero in a sacred drama – intensified, rarefied, baptized in the turbulent waters of restlessness, curiosity, and ardor.”

— Philip Zaleski

 

I almost missed writing today’s entry.  Time continues to be a mystical journey of sorts, unfolding less linear and more quantum, with eternal moments that seem to last for days.

This weekend was filled with friendships.  Today, I met a friend and together she and I picked up another friend and her daughter so we could all go to church together.  It was a muggy hot day, so I released control and let the day be.

Afterwards, we visited memorial sites in Downtown Orlando honoring the 49 people killed in the recent nightclub massacred.  Everyone was respectful and solemn as they viewed the altar items.

It’s beginning to become increasingly clear, as it was so in NYC during 911, that we are all now looking each other in eyes, smiling, talking and listening to one another.  I can see that especially when shopping.  It’s much easier to lovingly connect with strangers.

While home, I got caught up in the throes of deep cleaning with a great amount of zeal.   It felt so good to do so, especially since I had been putting it for awhile.

A friend called while working diligently and I got into a zealous conversation with her over religion.  But, what was different was that we both went to great lengths when signing off from our disagreement to leave our friendship in tack and on good terms.

Let’s continue to elevates our thoughts and actions, sojourners, and abide more in love, compassion, deep listening, and understanding!  Our world needs our commitment more than ever now.

Much Love, Tonya

 

 

 

Discussion

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