Sense

Definitions of Interest
: one of the five natural powers (touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing) through which you receive information about the world around you
: a particular feeling : an emotion that you are aware of
: conscious awareness or rationality : a motivating awareness : a discerning awareness and appreciation
: capacity for effective application of the powers of the mind as a basis for action or response : intelligence
: one of two opposite directions especially of motion (as of a point, line, or surface)

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Sense (n.): c. 1400, “faculty of perception,” also “meaning, import, interpretation” (especially of Holy Scripture), from Old French sensone of the five senses; meaning; wit, understanding” (12c.) and directly from Latin sensusperception, feeling, undertaking, meaning,” from sentireperceive, feel, know,” probably a figurative use of a literally meaning “to find one’s way,” or “to go mentally,” from Proto-Indo-European root, sentto go” (cognates: Old High German sinnanto go, travel, strive after, have in mind, perceive,” German Sinnsense, mind,” Old English siðway, journey,” Old Irish set, Welsh hyntway“). Application to any one of the external or outward senses (touch, sight, hearing, etc.) in English first recorded 1520s.

Meaning “that which is wise” is from c. 1600. Meaning “capacity for perception and appreciation” is from c. 1600 (as in sense of humor, attested by 1783, sense of shame, 1640s).

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“I am not a genius. I am just curious. I ask many questions. And when the answer is simple, then God is answering.”

Albert Einstein (1879-1955, German-born theoretical physicist who developed the general theory of relativity, among other feats, considered the most influential physicist of the 20th century.)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com

“Genius ain’t anything more than elegant common sense.”

Josh Billings (1818-1885, 19th- century American humorist, Henry Wheeler Shaw, one of the most famous humor and lecturer in the U.S.)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Josh_Billings

“At the first kiss I felt something melt inside me that hurt in an exquisite way. All my longings, all my dreams and sweet anguish, All the secrets that slept deep within me came awake, Everything was transformed and enchanted, everything made sense.”

Hermann Hesse (1877-1962, German-born Swiss poet, novelist, and painter; best known for writing Steppenwolf, Siddhartha, and The Glass Bead Game, which explored the individual’s search for authenticity, self-knowledge, and spirituality; received The Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946.)

Bio Source:

www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1946/hesse-bio.html

“A deep sense of love and belonging is an irreducible need of all people. We are biologically, cognitively, physically, and spiritually wired to love, to be loved, and to belong. When those needs are not met, we don’t function as we were meant to. We break. We fall apart. We numb. We ache. We hurt others. We get sick.”

Brené Brown (b. 1965, American scholar, author, story-teller, and researcher)

Bio Source:

brenebrown.com

“A story must be judged according to whether it makes sense. And 'making sense' must be here understood in its most direct meaning: to make sense is to enliven the senses. A story that makes sense is one that stirs the senses from their slumber, one that opens the eyes and the ears to their real surroundings, tuning the tongue to the actual tastes in the air and sending chills of recognition along the surface of the skin. To make sense is to release the body from the constraints imposed by outworn ways of speaking, and hence to renew and rejuvenate one's felt awareness of the world. It is to make the senses wake up to where they are.”

David Abram (b. 1957, American philosopher, cultural ecologist, author, and performance artist, best known for bridging the philosophical tradition of phenomenology with environment and ecological issues; author of Becoming Animal: An Earthly Cosmology and The Spell of the Sensuous: Perception and Language in a More-Than-Human World.)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Abram

Meditation

“A deep sense of love and belonging is an irreducible need of all people. We are biologically, cognitively, physically, and spiritually wired to love, to be loved, and to belong. When those needs are not met, we don’t function as we were meant to. We break. We fall apart. We numb. We ache. We hurt others. We get sick.”

— Brené Brown

We all need to love and to feel at every possible level of our being.  And we can do so more fully as we awaken to deeper levels of souls and vast horizons of our senses.

And we must not ever be afraid of our emotions, passions, ecstasy, elation, or joy, and to the contrast our hurt, suffering or pain, because these are huge indicators that we are kicking it as humans, living spectacularly on this beautiful and devoted planet.

Numbing and masking our pain are unconscious acts of treason against our bodies and souls, because we are forcing a disconnection between our humanity and our divinity.

So pay close attention what the body senses and feels.  When we do so the body will no longer have to shock us to get our attention.  We will begin to notice and feel the subtle nuances of the body’s sensory feedback.

The body never fails us.  It actually tries to protect and warn us, because its primary mission is to heal and to assist us in fulfilling our divine journey.  It has no stake in fooling us, unlike the mind, which can sometimes bend its will to reality.

Our bodies are in essence our best friends.  They will never fail, unless we constantly ignore its signals and abuse its form and God-given design.

Take great care and enjoy the infinite levels of the body’s and mind’s sensory possibilities.

With Love, Tonya

Discussion

One thought on “Sense

  1. Hi Tonya, how do you select the words? I find them personally appropriate. Thank you!

    Marcia
    March 24, 2016 at 10:16 am
    Mar. 24, '16

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