Sage

1 (a): wise through reflection and experience; (b) archaic: grave, solemn
2: proceeding from or characterized by wisdom, prudence, and good judgment

 

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Sage (n.): kind of herb (Salvia officinalis), early 14th century, from Old French sauge (13th century), from Latin salvia, from salvushealthy” (related to safe).  So called for its healing or preserving qualities.

Sage (n.): “man of profound wisdom,” mid-14th century. Originally applied to the Seven Sages — Thales, Solon, Periander, Cleobulus, Chilon, Bias, and Pittacus.

Sage (adj.): “wise,” c. 1300 (late 12th century as a surname), from Old French sagewise, knowledgeable, learned; shrewd, skillful” (11th centiru), from Gallo-Roman *sabius, from Vulgar Latin *sapius, from Latin saperehave a taste, have good taste, be wise,” from Proto-Indo-European root sap-to taste.” Meaning “characterized by wisdom” is from 1530s.

 

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

Sage is cleansing and sage is sacred.”

Pink (b. Alecia Beth Moore on 1979, American singer, songwriter, dancer, and actress)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pink_(singer)

“The sage does not hoard. The more he helps others, the more he benefits himself. The more he gives to others, the more he gets himself. The Way of Heaven does one good but never does one harm. The Way of the sage is to act but not to compete.”

Lao Tzu (died 531 BC, also known as “Laozi” means “Old (lao) Master (zi)” was an ancient Chinese philosopher who wrote a short book, Daodejing or Tao-te ching, which means the “Classic of the Way and Virtue,” whose influence was pervasive)

Bio Source:

plato.stanford.edu/entries/laozi/

“A wise man's goal shouldn't be to say something profound, but to say something useful.”

Criss Jami (b. Christopher James Gilbert in 1987, poet, essayist, philosopher; founder and designer of Killosopher Apparel; author of “Healology” and “Salomé: In Every Inch In Every Mile;” and former lead singer of the rock band, Venus)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/4860176.Criss_Jami

“In its conception the literature prize belongs to days when a writer could still be thought of as, by virtue of his or her occupation, a sage, someone with no institutional affiliations who could offer an authoritative word on our times as well as on our moral life.”

J.M. Coetzee (b. 1940, South African novelist, essayist, linguist, translator of Dutch and Afrikaans literature, and recipient of the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature)

Bio Source:

www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/2003/coetzee-bio.html

“The best entrepreneurs know when to ignore sage advice.”

Sarah Lacy (b. 1975, technology journalist, author, and founder and editor-in-chief of Pando)

Bio Source:

pando.com/author/pandosarahlacy/

Meditation

“Sage is cleansing and sage is sacred.” — Pink

 

Shamanism, for me, has been an important spiritual practice that has  connected me back to my intuitive self and to Source Energy, which lead me to the path of Christian Mysticism.

With the help of a shaman, teachers, and spiritual guides I along with other spiritual seekers participated in rituals toward healing and initiation.  Before going into these sacred spaces, however, each of us had to smudge one another with the smoke of burning sage.  There is something magical about being cleansed with sage.

I remembered that feeling once while attending a christening at the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City some years ago.   There were three families who came forward ceremoniously to present their children to the church.  One particularly beautiful and well-dressed Latino family looked like royalty when they dedicated their two of their sons, one a baby and the older boy around the age of 5.   Both children were dressed in white, and the older boy looked sharp in his suit, vest and bow tie.

The pastor cradled the baby gently in her arms and doused the child not only in water but in the blessings of her prayers.  The pastor then a little challenged picked up the older boy, and as she did the boy leaned back, surrendering fully to his promised Grace.  The congregation breathed and then swelled with genuine joy.

Afterwards, the reverend walked up and down the aisles, spraying the entire congregation with the holy water and christened all of us.  Along with being smudged by sage, that was one of the most awe-inspiring and sacred moments to experience.

Stay alert, sojourners, to all the miraculous and sensual blessings of our world.

Much Love, Tonya

 

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