Sacred

: worthy of religious worship: very holy
: relating to religion
: highly valued and important: deserving great respect

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Sacred (adj.): late 14th century, past participle adjective from obsolete verb sacrento make holy,” from Old French sacrerconsecrate, anoint, dedicate” (12th century) or directly from Latin sacrareto make sacred, consecrate; hold sacred; immortalize; set apart, dedicate,” from sacersacred, dedicated, holy, accursed,” from Old Latin saceres, from Proto-Indo-European root sak-to sanctify.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“...the Sierra, a region so quiet and pristine that we have the sense of being the first human beings ever to set foot in it. We fall silent ourselves in its midst, as if conversation in a place of such primeval solitude would be like talking in church.”

Jim Fergus (b. 1950, author and best known for writing “One Thousand White Women,” trilogy)

Bio Source:

jimfergus.com

“To theology, ... only what it holds sacred is true, whereas to philosophy, only what holds true is sacred.”

Ludwig Feuerbach (1804-1872, German philosopher, anthropologist, and moralist remembered for his influence on Karl Marx and for his humanistic theologizing; best known for writing “The Essence of Christianity”)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Ludwig-Feuerbach

“I don't believe for a minute that the proof of God's existence is achieved. My faith prohibits me from believing that the proof of God's existence can ever be adduced. My God is not an object for verification. He is a subject for love. My faith is not knowledge, it is acceptance. It is a matter not of calculation but of trust.”

Laurence Cossé (b. 1950, she was first a journalist in the French newspaper, “Le Quotidien de Paris,” and now a novelist, best known for writing “A Corner of the Veil: A Novel”)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/783644.Laurence_Coss_

“Today is sacred - for it will never come again. What could be more important than living this day with attention and the intention to be of benefit, to the best of your ability, to all you encounter?”

John Bruna (author, counselor, educator, and mindfulness and Dharma teacher)

Bio Source:

wocompassion.org/about-us/john-bruna-biography/

“To the poet, to the philosopher, to the saint, all things are friendly and sacred, all events profitable, all days holy, all men divine.”

Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882, essayist, poet, and popular philosopher, “who developed a metaphysics of process”… and “an ‘existentialist’ ethics of self-improvement”)

Bio Source:

plato.stanford.edu/entries/emerson/

“Prayers are a very personal and sacred thing. One prays when one feels like. Feel disgusted when I see people forcing others to pray, carry out certain rituals or chant the prayers loudly on loudspeakers.”

Neelam Saxena Chandra (b. 1969, Indian poet and author of children’s fictional stories in English and Hindi)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neelam_Saxena_Chandra

“The nod of a head is such a small thing, it can mean so little, yet it is the gesture of assent that allows, that makes to be. The nod is the gesture of power, the yes. The numen, the presence of the sacred, is called by its name.”

Ursula K. Le Guin (b. 1929, fantasy and science fiction short story writer and novelist)

Bio Source:

www.theparisreview.org/interviews/6253/the-art-of-fiction-no-221-ursula-k-le-guin

Meditation

“The nod of a head is such a small thing, it can mean so little, yet it is the gesture of assent that allows, that makes to be. The nod is the gesture of power, the yes. The numen, the presence of the sacred, is called by its name.”

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

What a person holds sacred sheds light on his or her values and beliefs.

Not only do I hold my relationships sacred, especially my relationship with God, my children, my friends and family, and all that is holy in the world.  I also cherish the honest and authentic relationship I cultivate with my self.

Many years ago, when I worked for a college in New York City I had a director who would come to my office and talk about different people in the division.  I listened closely always expecting her to ask me to do one task or another.  But, oddly enough those requests never came.  When I would not respond or chime in to her gossiping, she would eventually get up and leave.

I was always respectful, alert, and attentive, but intuitively I knew it was unwise to nod my head in agreement.  Instinctively, I also knew that my nod could be twisted against another colleague.

Culturally, it’s quite normal to nod in acknowledgment of what another person is saying.  But, sometimes a nod can inadvertently do harm indirectly to another.

Sojourners, what do you hold sacred, and do your thoughts, gestures and deeds align?

Yours Truly, Tonya

 

 

 

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