Rise

: to move upward: ascend
: to become higher
: to return from death
: to become heartened or elated
: to come into being: originate

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Rise (n.): “upward movement,” 1570s. Meaning “a piece of rising ground” is from 1630s. Meaning “spring, source, origin, beginning” is from 1620s. Phrase to get a rise out of (someone) is a metaphor from angling (1650s).

Rise (v.): Old English risan “to rise, rise from sleep, get out of bed; stand up, rise to one’s feet; get up from table; rise together; be fit, be proper,” from Proto-Germanic us-risananto go up.”

From c. 1200 as “move from a lower to a higher position, move upward; increase in number or amount; rise in fortune, prosper; become prominent;” also “rise from the dead.” Meaning “come into existence, originate; result (from)” is mid-13th century. From early 14th century as “rebel, revolt;” also “occur, happen, come to pass; take place.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“But I say to you, Love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be sons of your Father who is in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good, and sends rain on the just and on the unjust.”

Jesus Christ

“How can you rise, if you have not burned?”

Hiba Fatima Ahmad (writer)

Rise and rise again until lambs become lions”

Robin Hood (heroic outlaw in English folklore who, according to legend, was a highly skilled archer and swordsman)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robin_Hood

“In a world of love
lightning and rainbow
are lovers now.
They arc and strike
upon the horizon of credence
to rise above their cloudy vow”

Munia Khan (b. 1981, poet and author of “Beyond The Vernal Mind”)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/6552863.Munia_Khan

“What makes a hero? Courage, strength, morality, withstanding adversity? Are these the traits that truly show and create a hero? Is the light truly the source of darkness or vice versa? Is the soul a source of hope or despair? Who are these so called heroes and where do they come from? Are their origins in obscurity or in plain sight?”

Fyodor Dostoyevsky (1821-1881, born Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, modern, existentialist, and influential 20th century Russian novelist and short-story writer who penetrated into the dark recesses of the human heart with his illuminated insights)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Fyodor-Dostoyevsky

“I do not think that a man's rise to power is necessarily the climax of his life or that his loss of office should be equated with his fall.”

Isaac Deutscher (1907-1967, Polish writer, journalist, and political wriwter who moved to the United Kingdom at the outbreak of World War II; best known for “The Prophet Armed: Trotsky, 1879-1921”)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isaac_Deutscher

“Wise is the woman who rises above her circumstances.”

Liz Curtis Higgs (“an encourager” and author of such books as, “Bad Girls of the Bible: And What We Can Learn from Them”)

Bio Source:

www.lizcurtishiggs.com/about-liz/

“Bad things do happen; how I respond to them defines my character and the quality of my life. I can choose to sit in perpetual sadness, immobilized by the gravity of my loss, or I can choose to rise from the pain and treasure the most precious gift I have – life itself.”

Walter Anderson (1903-1965, painter, writer, and naturalist)

Bio Source:

walterandersonart.com/pages/about-walter-anderson

“I have lived pain, and my life can tell: I only deepen the wound of the world when I neglect to give thanks the heavy perfume of wild roses in early July and the song of crickets on summer humid nights and the rivers that run and the stars that rise and the rain that falls and all the good things that a good God gives.”

Ann Voskamp (b. 1973, wife to The Farmer, mama of six, and author of the New York Times Bestseller, “One Thousand Gifts: A Dare to Live Fully Right Where You Are”)

Bio Source:

www.aholyexperience.com/ann-voskamp/

Meditation

“Bad things do happen; how I respond to them defines my character and the quality of my life. I can choose to sit in perpetual sadness, immobilized by the gravity of my loss, or I can choose to rise from the pain and treasure the most precious gift I have – life itself.” — Walter Anderson

 

Our lives can feel like a composition of musical waves of crescendos and base notes, the rise of falls with peaks of elation and the valleys of sorrow.  These bells curves are not evenly spaced, logical, or predicable.  Depending on one’s life mission, the valleys can come at the beginning of one’s life or at the end.

My life, for example, was riddled with deep sadness at the beginning.  I had a very traumatic childhood.  It wasn’t until I reached my mid-thirties when I was able to make a commitment to steer my ship into destiny body of happiness and peace.  But, in a way that journey felt as energetically intense as my childhood, with one vital exception; I was responsible for my inner work, and learning not to accept exterior circumstances to control and limit my life.

Music, art, and professional actualization are what helped wake me out of my slumber, that and the rise and fallout of important and catastrophic relationships, which taught me in the end to love and value myself.

The death of my mother, getting divorce, losing a job, etc. were my initiations that catapult from levels of humility to character.

Rise up, sojourners, and build as Richard Rohr says, a life of “foundational happiness and contentment” and “foundational enlightenment.”

Much Love, Tonya

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *