Resilience

1:  the capability of a strained body to recover its size and shape after deformation caused especially by compressive stress
2:  an ability to recover from or adjust easily to misfortune or change

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Resilience (n.): 1620s, “act of rebounding,” from Latin resiliens, present participle of resilire “to rebound, recoil,” from re- back” + salire “to jump, leap.”  Meaning “elasticity” is from 1824.

Source: etymonline.com

Wisdom

“My religion is Get Over It.” 

Nora Ephron (1941-2012, screenwriter, director, essayist, journalist, playwright, and humorist in the mold of Dorothy Parker; best known for directing "When Harry Met Sally" and "Sleepless in Seattle")

Bio Source:

www.nytimes.com/2012/06/27/movies/nora-ephron-essayist-screenwriter-and-director-dies-at-71.html

“The point of living in the world is just to stay interested.” 

Kathleen Rooney (writer, editor, publisher, and educator; best known for writing "Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk")

Bio Source:

kathleenrooney.com/about/

“No matter how you define success, you will need to be resilient, empowered, authentic, and limber to get there.” 

Joanie Connell (president of Flexible Work Solutions and author of "Flying Without a Helicopter: How to Prepare Young People for Work and Life")

Bio Source:

www.linkedin.com/in/joanieconnell

“If your heart is broken, make art with the pieces."

Shane L. Koyczan (b. 1976, Canadian spoken word poet, writer, and member of the group Tons of Fun University; known for writing about issues like bullying, cancer, death, and eating disorders)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shane_Koyczan

“I did not tell you that it would be okay, because I have never believed it would be okay. What I told you is what your grandparents tried to tell me: that this is your country, that this is your world, that this is your body, and you must find some way to live within the all of it.” 

Ta-Nehisi Coates (b. 1975, writer, journalist, educator and national correspondent for “The Atlantic” magazine, and recipient of The MacArthur Fellows Program award)

Bio Source:

www.macfound.org/fellows/931/

“Healing is your right, your responsibility and the risk you can't afford not to take.” 

Thaiia Senquetta (soul self-care coach, healing cultivator, writer, poet, and author of "Honey peppered tongue")

Bio Source:

www.thaiiasenquetta.com

“‎Hold yourself responsible for a higher standard than anybody else expects of you. Never excuse yourself. Never pity yourself. Be a hard master to yourself-and be lenient to everybody else.” 

Henry Ward Beecher (1813-1887, American Congregationalist preacher, who emphasized God’s Love; activist, social reformer, and speaker, known for his support of the abolition of slavery and the women’s suffrage; he’s also the brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/henry-ward-beecher-9204662#synopsis

Meditation

“Healing is your right, your responsibility and the risk you can’t afford not to take.”

Thaiia Senquetta

 

We have all had our share of suffering.  Whether it was through grief, tragedy, loss or sickness, all exists on the spectrum of our human conditions.  But, no matter how challenging any given situation, we need the wherewithal to transcend and to see our ways through.

Resilience is about picking ourselves up, shaking ourselves off, and starting anew.

Now, that’s not always easy.  It takes time to align the mind, body, spirit, and soul to relax and then initiate the healing process.  Sometimes, it takes years in fact, because we are always cycling around and transforming our issues so we can ascend them.

Healing, whether physical, emotionally, or spiritually, takes sheer determination and heart.  It takes a tremendous amount of strength and courage.   It also takes surrendering to our natural states of grace and faith.  Because once we can calm the waters, we can rewire our minds and bodies.

Essentially, unnecessary stress and worry only exacerbate our imagined or realized circumstances.

Wellbeing is our birthright.  Realizing is half the battle.  Because, once we know we are worthy, we can honor ourselves by working daily to improve our conditions.

As we have developed healthy routines, we must also prime our spiritual disciplines so they too can become habitual and common-place.

Some daily rituals that may be considered and customized are:

  • Stream-of-consciousness journaling
  • Devotional reading
  • Stretching
  • Exercise
  • Meditation
  • Conscious acts of kindness
  • Gratitude

Sojourners, it’s about being resiliency, and our resistance towards stagnation.

Faithfully Yours, Tonya

 

 

 

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