Plastic

1: formative, creative
2 (a): capable of being molded or modeled; (b): capable of adapting to varying conditions: pliable
3: sculptural
4: made or consisting of a plastic
5: capable of being deformed continuously and permanently in any direction without rupture

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Plastic (adj.): 1630s, “capable of shaping or molding,” from Latin plasticus, from Greek plastikosable to be molded, pertaining to molding, fit for molding,” also in reference to the arts, from plastosmolded, formed,” verbal adjective from plasseinto mold” (related to: plasma). Surgical sense of “remedying a deficiency of structure” is first recorded 1839 (in plastic surgery). Meaning “made of plastic” is from 1909. Picked up in counterculture slang with meaning “false, superficial” (1963). Plastic explosive attested from 1894.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Could the young but realize how soon they would become mere walking bundles of habits, they would give more heed to their conduct while in the plastic state.”

William James (1842-1910, an original thinker in and between the disciplines of physiology, psychology, and philosophy; best known for his twelve-hundred page masterwork, “The Principles of Psychology”; he influenced generations of thinkers including Edmund Husserl, Bertrand Russell, John Dewey, and Ludwig Wittgenstein.)

Bio Source:

plato.stanford.edu/entries/james/

“With plastic surgery, the general anesthetic is like a black-velvety sleep, and that’s what death is – without waking up to someone clapping and going, ‘Joan, wake up, it’s all over and you’re looking pretty.’”

Joan Rivers (1933-2014, born Joan Alexandra Molinsky, comedian, actress, writer, producer, talk show host, and reality television star)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/joan-rivers-324890#joan-&-melissa-and-other-recent-projects

“I love Los Angeles, and I love Hollywood. They’re beautiful. Everybody’s plastic, but I love plastic. I want to be plastic.”

Andy Warhol (1928-1987, leading artist of the 1960s pop art movement; painter, filmmaker, illustrator and one of the most prolific and popular artists of his time, using both avant-garde and highly commercial sensibilities)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/andy-warhol-9523875

“A garden is a complex of aesthetic and plastic intentions; and the plant is, to a landscape artist, not only a plant – rare, unusual, ordinary or doomed to disappearance – but it is also a color, a shape, a volume or an arabesque in itself.”

Roberto Burle Marx (1909-1994, Brazilian Modernist and one of the most influential landscape architects of the twentieth century)

Bio Source:

thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/roberto-burle-marx-brazilian-modernist#about

“I hate the hand that comes out of a car and just drops litter in the street. I hate that! For some reason, it just fills me with fury! It’s just utter laziness, lack of interest in other people, lack of interest in the planet, in the hedgehog who might eat the plastic bag, it’s a lack of concern.”

Joanna Lumley (b. 1946, English actress, born in Kashmir, India and raised in the Far East, former model, author and activist)

Bio Source:

www.imdb.com/name/nm0525921/

“There were waves of genocide that overcame indigenous populations of Oceania and do we have a library of books or films to tell our story? No. We have tourist hula shows and commercials where the “natives” tend to tourists like indentured servants with plastic, lifeless smiles. It’s not such a charming picture, is it? The truth is ugly, but so is ignorance or denial of such atrocities and pain.”

M.B. Dallocchio (medic, mental health sergeant, served as a member of “Team Lioness,” the first female team that was attached to Marine infantry units to perform checkpoint operations, house raids, and personnel search on Iraqi women and children for weapons and explosives; also the author of “Quixote in Ramadi: An Indigenous Account of Imperialism” and the Women Warriors chapter of the book, “War Trauma and Its Wake.”)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/7136643.M_B_Dallocchio

“For all the environmental troubles single-use shopping bags cause, the much greater impacts are in what they contain. reducing the human footprint means addressing fundamentally unsustainable habits of food consumption, such as expecting strawberries in the depths of winter or buying of seafood that are being fished to the brink of extinction.”

Susan Freinkel (b. 1947, science writer, whose work has appeared in a number of national publications; and author of “Plastic: A Toxic Love Story” and “American Chestnut: The Life, Death, and Rebirth of a Perfect Tree”)

Bio Source:

susanfreinkel.com/author.html

Meditation

“A garden is a complex of aesthetic and plastic intentions; and the plant is, to a landscape artist, not only a plant – rare, unusual, ordinary or doomed to disappearance – but it is also a color, a shape, a volume or an arabesque in itself.”

— Roberto Burle Marx

What if we could shape our lives the way landscapers design their gardens, with complete surrender, imagination, and faith?

I was fascinated by the biography of Roberto Burle Marx, someone I knew nothing of before.  That’s the magic in researching.  I get to learn so many new things, especially about the world and those masters who came before and who also live now.  There are so many men, women, and children who have perfected their lives and crafts, quietly and boldly, sometimes at the same time.

That’s also the fascinating part of the internet, we can access some of the biographical information as we need, or  at least get some very credible leads.

Burle Marx’s biography was written by the Jewish Museum as follows:

Roberto Burle Marx was one of the most influential landscape architects of the twentieth century, yet he is not a familiar figure outside of his native Brazil.  He is best known for his iconic seaside pavements on Rio de Janeiro’s Copacabana Beach, and for his abstract, geometric garden designs.  But his work encompasses an enormous range of artistic forms and styles: Burle Marx was a painter and sculptor; a designer of textiles, jewelry, theater sets, and costumes; a ceramicist and stained-glass artist; avid art collector, talented baritone, a consummate cook, and visionary self-taught botanist and ecologist.  For him, all these endeavors were equally important, facets of one another.

What a living example of inspiration he was and is!  I want to be that creative and plastic.  Like so many artists Robert Burle Marx did not limit himself.  He created in and outside “the box.”

Creations abound!

Miraculously Yours, Tonya

 

Discussion

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