Perfect

1: to bring to final form
2: to make perfect: IMPROVE, REFINE

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Perfect (v.): “to bring to full development,” late 14th century, parfiten, from perfect (adj.)

Perfect (adj.): early 15th century alteration of Middle English parfit (c. 1300), from Old French parfitfinished, completed, ready” (11th century), from Latin perfectuscompleted, excellent, accomplished, exquisite,” past participle of perficereaccomplish, finish, complete,” from per-completely” + facereto make, do, perform” (related to factitious). Often used in English as an intensive (perfect stranger, etc.). Grammatical sense, in reference to verb tense, is from c. 1500.   As a noun, late 14th century (“perfection”), from the adjective.

 

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“There are no wrong roads to anywhere.”

Norton Juster (b. 1829, American academic, architect, and popular writer; best known as the author of children’s books, notably for his first book, “The Phantom Tollbooth,” published in 1961 and “The Dot and the Line,” which was adapted into an Academy-Award winning film.)

Bio Source:

www.scholastic.com/teachers/contributor/norton-juster

“Have patience with all things but first with yourself. Never confuse your mistakes with your value as a human being. You are perfectly valuable, creative, worthwhile person simply because you exist. And no amount of triumphs or tribulations can ever change that.”

Saint Francis de Sales (1567-1622, bishop of the diocese of Geneva, known for bringing the word of God to ordinary people through letters. He is also known as the Patron Saint of Journalist and writers.)

Bio Source:

www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=51

“I think perfect love is any time you love unconditionally, without selfish intent, without concern for personal gain.”

Erin McCarthy (b. 1971, author of 38 novels and novellas in the paranormal, contemporary romance, and young adult genres)

Bio Source:

www.erinmccarthy.net/bio/

“There is truth, my boy. But the doctrine you desire, absolute, perfect dogma that alone provides wisdom, does not exist. Nor should you long for a perfect doctrine, my friend. Rather, you should long for the perfection of yourself. The deity is within you, not in ideas and books. Truth is lived, not taught.”

Hermann Hesse (1877-1962, German-born Swiss poet, novelist, and painter; best known works include “The Glass Bead Game,” “Steppenwolf,” and “Siddhartha”; also received The Nobel Prize in Literature in 1946.)

Bio Source:

www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/literature/laureates/1946/hesse-bio.html

“You shall love your neighbour
With your crooked heart,
It says so much about love and brokenness -- it's perfect.”

John Green (b. 1977, American author of young adult fiction; won the 2006 Printz Award for his debut novel, “Looking for Alaska” and for his sixth novel, “The Fault of Our Stars.”)

Bio Source:

johngreenbooks.com/bio-contact/

“God always ignores the present perfection for the ultimate perfection.”

Oswald Chambers (1874-1917, early twentieth-century Scottish Baptist and Holiness Movement evangelist and teacher, best known for his devotional, “My Utmost for His Highest.”)

Bio Source:

utmost.org/oswald-chambers-bio/

“The last of the cherry blossom. On the tree, it turns ever more perfect. And when it’s perfect, it falls. And then of course once it hits the ground it gets all mushed up. So it’s only absolutely perfect when it’s falling through the air, this way and that, for the briefest time!.!.!.”

David Mitchell (b. 1969, English novelist of seven novels, two of which were shortlisted for the Booker Prize, “number9dream” and “Cloud Atlas”)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Mitchell_(author)

Meditation

“Have patience with all things but first with yourself. Never confuse your mistakes with your value as a human being. You are perfectly valuable, creative, worthwhile person simply because you exist. And no amount of triumphs or tribulations can ever change that.”

— Saint Francis de Sales

The spiritual quest is all about perfecting the soul, but it’s not about being perfect.  It’s actually, as Richard Rohr has suggested, about the flow of our souls’ “ordering, disordering, and reordering.”  What can also be called birth, death, and re-birth.

It’s allowing and surrendering to continuous transformational cycles of purging toxic patterns, allowing new energies, and transmuting to higher stages of awareness.  It’s accepting to be struck by lightening repeatedly and overcoming throughout the harrowing ordeals.

It takes a great deal of patience to transform and shift to new levels of consciousness.  We have to learn to forgive ourselves over and over again for our accumulated bad habits, personality shortcomings, and for creating unconscious and haphazard lives.

But, how spectacular to make the choice to perfect and refine our beings.  What a personal courageous act of faith and love is that!  Individually, we are choosing to step out on the precipice of change and leap into the abyss, the unknown, and risk all comforts of what we thought we knew.

Once we make the choice to change we will definitely not be alone on our journeys.  We will be helped by an array of Divine Help.  And we will also be able to find our soul mates, those who will help and strengthen us work collectively and collaboratively.  We only need to be present and to open our eyes to the synchronistic circumstances that are aligning and conspiring on our behalf.  We will then have the capacity to enjoy the glorious unfolding of our magnificent and miraculous lives.

Let us continue to perfect, grow, and radiate the Godseeds we each possess inside.

Miraculously Yours, Tonya

 

 

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