Patient, Patience

1 : bearing pain or trials calmly or without complaint
2 : manifesting forbearance under provocation or strain
3 : not hasty or impetuous
4 : steadfast despite opposition, difficulty, or adversity
5: a) able or willing to bear; b) susceptible, admitting

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Patience (n.): c. 1200, “quality of being willing to bear adversities, calm endurance of misfortune, suffering, etc.,” from Old French pacience, “sufferance, permission” (12c.) and directly from Latin patientiaendurance, submission,” also “indulgence, leniency; humility; submissiveness; submission to lust;” literally “quality of suffering.”

It is an abstract noun formed from the adjective patientembearing, supporting; suffering, enduring, permitting; tolerant,” but also “firm, unyielding, hard,” used for person as well as of navigable rivers, present participle of patito suffer, endure,” Proto-Indo-European root pe(i)– “to damage, injure hurt” (related to passion).

Meaning “constancy in effort” is attested from 1510s. Meaning “card game for one person” is from 1816.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Patience is a conquering virtue.”

Geoffrey Chaucer (1343-1400, known as the Father of English literature, widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages, and the first be buried in Poets’ Corner of Westminster Abbey.)

Bio Source:

www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/geoffrey-chaucer

“The strongest of all warriors are these two — Time and Patience.”

Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910, Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, a Russian author known for writing War and Peace, Anna Karenina, and The Death of Ivan Ilyich, and ranked as one of the greatest writers of all times.)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/leo-tolstoy-9508518#synopsis

“Patience is power.
Patience is not an absence of action;
rather it is ‘timing’
it waits on the right time to act,
for the right principles
and in the right way.”

Fulton J. Sheen (1895-1979, American archbishop of the Roman Catholic Church, television actor of TV and radio, and master communicator; his canonization as a saint was officially opened in 2002.)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fulton_J._Sheen

“Patience is bitter, but its fruit is sweet.”

Aristotle 384 BC – 322 BC, Greek philosopher, scientist, researcher, and writer is counted as one of the greatest philosophers of all time; only Plato is considered his peer.)

Bio Source:

plato.stanford.edu/entries/aristotle/

“No, no! The adventures first, explanations take such a dreadful time.”

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898, pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, writer, math teacher, cleric, and English author of “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-Glass.”)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/lewis-carroll-9239598

“There are times to stay put, and what you want will come to you, and there are times to go out into the world and find such a thing for yourself.”

Lemony Snicket (pen name of American novelist Daniel Handler, author of such children’s books as A Series of Unfortunate Events and All the Wrong Questions)

Bio Source:

www.lemonysnicket.com/author.html

“Make your ego porous. Will is of little importance, complaining is nothing, fame is nothing. Openness, patience, receptivity, solitude is everything.”

Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926, René Karl Wilheim Johan Joseph Maria Rilke, Bohemian-Austrian poet and novelist; widely recognized as one of the most lyrically intense German-language poets.)

Bio Source:

www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/rainer-maria-rilke

“Water does not resist. Water flows. When you plunge your hand into it, all you feel is a caress. Water is not a solid wall, it will not stop you. But water always goes where it wants to go, and nothing in the end can stand against it. Water is patient. Dripping water wears away a stone. Remember that, my child. Remember you are half water. If you can't go through an obstacle, go around it. Water does.”

Margaret Atwood (b. 1939, Canadian poet, novelist, literary critic, essayist, environmental activist, and author of more than forty volumes of work)

Bio Source:

margaretatwood.ca/biography/

“No pain that we suffer, no trial that we experience is wasted. It ministers to our education, to the development of such qualities as patience, faith, fortitude and humility. All that we suffer and all that we endure, especially when we endure it patiently, builds up our characters, purifies our hearts, expands our souls, and makes us more tender and charitable, more worthy to be called the children of God . . . and it is through sorrow and suffering, toil and tribulation, that we gain the education that we come here to acquire and which will make us more like our Father and Mother in heaven.”

Orson F. Whitney (1855-1931, politician, journalist, poet, historian, academic, and member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1906 until his death)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orson_F._Whitney

Meditation

“Patience is power.
Patience is not an absence of action;
rather it is ‘timing’
it waits on the right time to act,
for the right principles
and in the right way.”  — Fulton J. Sheen

Like most folks I, too, am sometimes challenged by the concept of patience.  It can sometimes be difficult to fully accept and allow circumstances to be, and to flow with the divine energies of one’s growth and evolution.

Even when creating this writing meditation I had to come back to it several times, because I was forcing it to be something that it was not.

Writing, much like creating music, art, or anything for that matter, should be an authentic dissertation of one’s truth and experiences.  If it’s a lie, like all creations, it will not flow or deepen, but instead be a shallow expression of utter nonsense.  Sometimes our creations take a great deal of patience and time to develop, and sometimes we have to walk away, come back and try again.

Creativity is a lot like giving birthing.  Ultimately, the child doesn’t belong to you, and you have very little control over this being except to take great care of yourself, your guardianship and relationship.  When it is ready a baby comes through you and is a part of your DNA, but it is not you.  A child, as a metaphoric symbol of our developing desires and dreams, requires a great deal of patience, acceptance, and nurturing, and can sometimes mirror our frustrations and limitations to bust out and fly and soar.

It takes time, compassion, and love to discipline and deepen one’s capabilities.  It takes patience to be present, grounded, to listen, and to awaken to the small, big, ordinary and inspired actions we need to do.   But it also takes a great deal of compassion to face oneself, one’s humanity and one’s divinity.  Once we do, we will harmonize, connect, shift, and have access to Life’s kaleidoscope of beautifully changing patterns of the newly created paradigms.

Ease in and ease forward, my beloved journey women and men.

Warmly, Tonya

 

 

 

 

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