Odyssey

1: a long wandering or voyage usually marked by many changes of fortune
2: an intellectual or spiritual wandering or quest

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Odyssey (n.): c. 1600, “Odyssey,” from Latin Odyssea, from Greek Odysseia, name of the Homeric epic poem of ancient Greece, relating the ten-ear wanderings of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the Trojan War. Figurative sense of “long, adventurous journey” is first recorded in 1889.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“They no longer wanted to entice anyone; all they wanted was to catch a glimpse for as long as possible of the reflected glory in the great eyes of Odysseus”

Franz Kafka (1883-1924, German-language writer of visionary fiction, best known for “The Metamorphosis”)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Franz-Kafka

“And when long years and seasons wheeling brought around that point of time ordained for him to make his passage homeward, trials and dangers, even so, attended him even in Ithaca, near those he loved.”

Homer (born sometime around 750 BC, arguable the greatest poet of the ancient world, and best known for “The Iliad” and “The Odyssey”)

Bio Source:

www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/homer

“I think songwriters are more related to fiction writers. The Odyssey was a story in song. To me, that’s so beautiful, all those painted characters, all those travels and adventures.”

Regina Spektor (b. 1980, Russian-born American singer-songwriter and classical-trained pianist)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regina_Spektor

“A voice expressing emotion in a musical way moves on. It’s the finale of the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) – the world turns in on itself, as a universe unto itself, in the shape of one human being.”

Dwight Yoakam (b. 1956, American country singer-songwriter, actor, and film director)

Bio Source:

www.dwightyoakam.com/

“To me, the fact that the Mexican came North in search of a better life is a tremendous epic that hasn’t been written. It’s an odyssey that we know nothing about. And they came with a dream for a better life.”

Rudolfo Anaya (b. 1937, Mexican-American author, educator, poet, playwright, best known for his 1972 novel, “Bless Me, Ultima,” “Heart of Aztlán,” and “Tortuga”)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/rudolfo-a-anaya-39694

Meditation

“To me, the fact that the Mexican came North in search of a better life is a tremendous epic that hasn’t been written. It’s an odyssey that we know nothing about. And they came with a dream for a better life.”

— Rudolfo Anaya

 

It’s a gift to contemplate our odysseys and those of our ancestors. What did it cost for us and for our mothers and fathers to take these life journeys in the harshest of conditions and against all odds?  How were we all able to defy death and to be delivered to this place and time?  What are the universal themes of our struggles, survival, and triumphs?

That’s one of the gifts of film and story, to open those time-space  portals to see, understand, and to empathize the humanity of others.

As a child, my favorite books to read was the science fiction genre, which so makes sense to me now.  I never really felt I was from this world or time zone.  So, I often enjoyed envisioning a more evolved future sprinkled with not only some challenges but  imbued with promise and hope.

The post-traumatic stress most of us have suffered from our personal odysseys come in part from the circular torment of  our ancestors.  Unless we have the courage to face ourselves and the pain we have endured through our histories and bloodlines we will not be able to acquire the strength and determination to break the psychological and spiritual patterns that imprison us.

Continue to be strong and observant, sojourners, as witnesses to the miracles and magic of our sacred voyages.

Much Love, Tonya

 

Discussion

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