Observant

1 (a): paying strict attention: watchful; (b): keen, perceptive
2: careful to follow religious teachings and customs: Mindful

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Observe (v.): late 14th century, “to hold to” (a manner of life or course of conduct), from Old French observer, osserverwatch over, follow” (10th century), from Latin observarewatch over, note, heed, look to, attend to, guard, regard, comply with,” from obover” + servareto watch, keep safe,” from Proto-Indo-European root ser-to protect.” Meaning “to attend to in practice, to keep, follow” is attested from late 14th century. Sense of “watch, perceive, notice” is 1560s, via notion of “see and note omens.” Meaning “to say by way of remark” is from c. 1600.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“To acquire knowledge, one must study;
but to acquire wisdom, one must observe.”

Marilyn Vos Savant (b. 1946, author, national columnist, lecturer, and playwright; an American who is known for having the highest record IQ according to the Guinness Book of Records, a category that has been retired; she is married to Robert Jarvik MD, the inventor of Jarvik artificial heart)

Bio Source:

marilynvossavant.com/about-marilyn/

“Observe your imperfections. Love them. Then move through them.”

Matthew Donnelly (author of “Spirit of Motivation” and “500 Personal Growth and Development Quotes: Unlimited Value Education”)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/11054002.Matthew_Donnelly

“Never trust to general impressions, my boy, but concentrate yourself upon details.”

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930, Scottish writer best known for his creation of the detective Sherlock Holmes)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Arthur-Conan-Doyle

“We kings do develop a certain ability to recognize objects under our noses.”

Robin McKinley (b. 1952, American author of fantasy and children’s books; best known for her 1984 book, “The Hero and the Crown,” which won the Newbery Medal)

Bio Source:

www.robinmckinley.com/bio.php

“With the utmost love and attention the man who walks must study and observe every smallest living thing, be it a child, a dog, a fly, a butterfly, a sparrow, a worm, a flower, a man, a house, a tree, a hedge, a snail, a mouse, a cloud, a hill, a leaf, or no more than a poor discarded scrap of paper on which, perhaps, a dear good child at school has written his first clumsy letters. The highest and the lowest, the most serious and the most hilarious things are to him equally beloved, beautiful, and valuable.”

Robert Walser (1878-1956, German-speaking Swiss writer, one whose work inspired Franz Kafka)

Bio Source:

www.nybooks.com/articles/2000/11/02/the-genius-of-robert-walser/

“Do stuff. be clenched, curious. Not waiting for inspiration's shove or society's kiss on your forehead. Pay attention. It's all about paying attention. attention is vitality. It connects you with others. It makes you eager. stay eager.”

Susan Sontag (1933-2004, American writer, filmmaker, teacher, and women’s rights and anti-war activist)

Bio Source:

www.susansontag.com/SusanSontag/

“(An unhappy childhood was not) an unsuitable preparation for my future, in that it demanded a constant wariness, the habit of observation, and the attendance on moods and tempers; the noting of discrepancies between speech and action; a certain reserve of demeanour; and automatic suspicion of sudden favours.”

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936, India-born English journalist, short-story writer, poet, novelist, remembered for his celebration of British imperialism, and best known for writing the “Jungle Book;” and recipient of The Nobel Prize in Literature in 1907)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Rudyard-Kipling

Meditation

“With the utmost love and attention the man who walks must study and observe every smallest living thing, be it a child, a dog, a fly, a butterfly, a sparrow, a worm, a flower, a man, a house, a tree, a hedge, a snail, a mouse, a cloud, a hill, a leaf, or no more than a poor discarded scrap of paper on which, perhaps, a dear good child at school has written his first clumsy letters. The highest and the lowest, the most serious and the most hilarious things are to him equally beloved, beautiful, and valuable.”  — Robert Walser

There’s a spiritual practice in shamanism called “shapeshifting,” where one merges with every part of creation becomes the tree, the sky, the clouds, etc.  This practice facilitates a more intimate relationship with the world, the cosmos, and the Universe itself, which allows one to fall more deeply in love with all of life and humanity, and to see life through God’s Eyes.

Perceiving life in this way provides the bridge to open up one’s heart, body’s senses, and intuitive extra-sensory perceptions.  That’s why meditation is an important spiritual discipline, because it promotes a practice of unity, an integration with one’s higher self and Inner Observer, where one can watch from more elevated states of awareness.

Shapeshifting creates sacred space and time in observance, a bridge towards unity consciousness.  Inner messages become clearer and so does inner knowing.  Provided messages come from a peaceful and wise place within, one can begin to trust what one observes and hears.

This is the gift of presence and of living in the now moments, to observe and act, accordingly.  But one must also have a keen sense of self to trust the divine wisdom within.

Have a glorious, peaceful, and restorative weekend, sojourners!

Faithfully Yours, Tonya

 

 

 

 

 

 

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