Mystery

: a religious truth that one can know only be revelation and cannot fully understand
: the secret or specialized practices or ritual particular to an occupation or body of people
: something not understood or beyond understanding : Enigma
obsolete : a private secret
: a piece of fiction dealing usually with the solution of a crime

Source: www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/mystery

Etymology

Mystery (n.1): early 14c., in a theological sense, “religious truth via divine revelation, mystical truth,” from Anglo-French misterie, Old French misteresecret, hidden meaning,” from Latin mysterium secret rite, secret worship; a secret thing,” from Greek mysterionsecret rite or doctrine, “ from mystesone who has been initiated,” from myeinto close, shut” (related to mute).

Mystery (n.2): “handicraft, trade, art” (archaic), late 14c., from Medieval Latin misterium, “service, occupation, office, ministry” (related to ministry), influenced in form by Medieval Latin mysterium and in sense by maistriemastery.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“It is only through mystery and madness that the soul is revealed”

Thomas Moore (1779-1852, Irish poet, musician, singer, and lyricist, now best remembered for the lyrics of “The Minstrel Boy” and “The Last Rose of Summer.” He embodied British Romanticism and was one of the first champions of freedom of Ireland, not only for the British and the Irish, but also for Americans and Europeans.)

Bio Source:

www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/thomas-moore

“You’re driving me NORMAL!”

Jeff Lindsay (Jeffrey P. Freundlich, b. 1952, age 63, best known for writing the Dexter series of novels; his wife is author Hilary Hemingway, niece of Ernest Hemingway)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Lindsay_(writer)

“I have lived one step away from losing my mind for years. I am quick and accurate in spotting unstable streaks in others.”

Charlaine Harris (b. 1951, age 63, American New York Times bestselling author, known for her urban fantasy series, “Sookie Stackhouse/True Blood” series)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlaine_Harris

“My mind," he said, "rebels at stagnation. Give me problems, give me work, give me the most abstruse cryptogram or the most intricate analysis, and I am in my own proper atmosphere. I can dispense then with artificial stimulants. But I abhor the dull routine of existence. I crave for mental exaltation. That is why I have chosen my own particular profession, or rather created it, for I am the only one in the world.”

Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930, British writer and physician, most noted for his fictional stories about the detective Sherlock Holmes)

Bio Source:

www.arthurconandoyle.com/

“I do not understand the mystery of grace – only that it meets us where we are and does not leave us where it found us.

Anne Lamott (b. 1954, age 61, American novelist, non-fiction writer, political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Lamott

“The most beautiful experience we can have is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion that stands at the cradle of true art and true science.”

Albert Einstein (1879-1955, German-born theoretical physicist who developed the general theory of relativity, one of the two pillars of modern physics; he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1921.)

Bio Source:

einstein.biz/biography.php

“The Cosmos is all that is or was or ever will be. Our feeblest contemplations of the Cosmos stir us -- there is a tingling in the spine, a catch in the voice, a faint sensation, as if a distant memory, of falling from a height. We know we are approaching the greatest of mysteries.”

Carl Sagan (1934-1996, American astronomer, cosmologist, astrophysicist, astrobiologist, author, science popularizer, and science communicator in astronomy and other natural sciences)

Bio Source:

www.carlsagan.com/

“We need the tonic of wildness... At the same time that we are earnest to explore and learn all things, we require that all things be mysterious and unexplorable, that land and sea be indefinitely wild, unsurveyed and unfathomed by us because unfathomable. We can never have enough of nature.”

Henry David Thoreau (American author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, tax resister, development critic, surveyor, and historian)

Bio Source:

www.thoreausociety.org/life-legacy

Meditation

Since I was a baby, I have always been comfortable in The Mystery, the mystical and the imaginal realms of Spirit.  It never really scared me.  Actually, it was my refuge and the safe place away from the traumatic events of the physical world.

In the early 1960s I was born into dramatic circumstances and worldly events.  My father and mother were children themselves, teenagers each at the age of 16 years.  They were also very devoted Pentecostal evangelists, who went door-to-door preaching the gospel and also helping to feed those with heroin addictions.

Being raised in Harlem and South Bronx communities of New York City it appeared as if my whole world was on fire.

Globally and nationally, there was a great deal of unrest with our country’s involvement in the Vietnam War, race riots, and the gruesome assassinations of our great, young and vibrant leaders: John F. Kennedy (in 1963 at the age of 46), Malcolm X (1965, age 40), Robert Kennedy (1968, age 43), and Martin Luther King, Jr. (1968, age 39).

Our country was mired chaos and drenched in grief.

Like most children, I was sensitive, but had additional super empathic abilities. I could sense the chronic hurt and pain of others, particularly strangers we passed on the streets.  I, inadvertently, took on the pain of others, which sometimes stricken me with asthma and depression.

The only way I felt safe, besides staying very closed to my mother, was to hide in a secret mystical closet of my mind.  In this small void of space everything was quiet and safe, and I knew somehow I was surrounded by love.

After my mother died when I was 10 years old and throughout my teenage years the need for solace in mystery was very great.  But, after I became an adult and had children of my own, I realized that I had to show up and be a committed, grounded, and centered mother.

It took some time with a lot of therapy and spiritual development, but it happened.  I can now acknowledge my wholeness and am a committed world citizen.

I can so choose when I want to dwell in The Mystery, and that’s usually in meditation, in Nature, and of course when I sleep.  It’s so magical to be a full-fledge human luminous being, a person conscious and more aware of the wonders and beauty of our developing New Earth.

May you too continue to know the mysteries and magic of your individual lives.

Stay well my friends,

Tonya

Discussion

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