Mindful

: aware of something that may be important

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Mindful (n.): mid-14th century, Old English myndful meant “of good memory.” Old English also had myndigrecollecting; thoughtful,” which if it had lived might have yielded a modern mindy.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“The most fundamental aggression to ourselves, the most fundamental harm we can do to ourselves, is to remain ignorant by not having the courage and the respect to look at ourselves honestly and gently.”

Pema Chödrön (b. 1936, American Tibetan Buddhist, teacher, ordained nun, mother, writer and director of the Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, Canada)

Bio Source:

pemachodronfoundation.org

“One is a great deal less anxious if one feels perfectly free to be anxious, and the same may be said of guilt.”

Alan W. Watts (1915-1973, British philosopher, writer, speaker; best known as an interpreter of Eastern philosophy)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alan_Watts

“Don’t let a day go by without asking who you are…each time you let a new ingredient to enter your awareness.”

Deepak Chopra (b. 1947, author of more than 80 books, medical doctor, public speaker, and teacher)

Bio Source:

www.chopra.com/about-us/deepak-chopra-md

Mindfulness is simply being aware of what is happening right now without wishing it were different; enjoying the pleasant without holding on when it changes (which it will); being with the unpleasant without fearing it will always be this way (which it won’t).”

James Baraz (meditation teacher and creator of the Awakening Joy course)

Bio Source:

www.awakeningjoy.info/teacher.html

Meditation

“The most fundamental aggression to ourselves, the most fundamental harm we can do to ourselves, is to remain ignorant by not having the courage and the respect to look at ourselves honestly and gently.”

— Pema Chödrön

 

It all has felt so surreal, hasn’t it? from the deep light resonance of Muhammad Ali’s death and funeral to the overwhelming darkness of shooting tragedies abroad in Israel and here in Orlando.

How is it that we humans are capable of such conviction to the Light and such destruction in shadow?  How is it that our planet still animates this spectrum of polarity?  How is that we are not weary of it all?  If we are, mustn’t we examine ourselves and look for opportunities to demonstrate “conscious acts of kindness.”

We all know that terrorists are agents of darkness and committed soldiers of hate.   We now have numerous personal testaments to that end, and are now witnessing more of these brutal acts of hatred, up close and personal.

But, we must ask ourselves also what are our commitments and convictions?  Are we truly committed to unconditional love and change agents to that end?  And this is a vert hard question to ask: in what ways to do we personally propagate hate?  After all, we are mirrors and important teachers to each other.

I love when watching Muhammad Ali’s funeral that there were so many children and teenagers repeating, “I am Muhammad Ali.” We must also look in ours mirrors, as scary as it may be, and ask how do we hate others in our unconscious thoughts and deeds.

Pope Francis was so on point in naming this year, “The Year of Mercy.” We need mercy now, more than ever. We need to receive and give mercy sometimes simultaneously.

With full hearts, let us use these recent events to quicken, transform and heal, while staying strong and faithful in our love.  Let us also stay alert and mindful and protective.

Faithfully Yours, Tonya

 

 

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