Metaphor

1: a figure of speech in which a word or phrase literally denoting one kind of object or idea is used in place of another to suggest a likeness or analogy between them; broadly: figurative language – compare, simile
2: an object, activity, or idea treated as a symbol

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Metaphor (n.): late 15th century, from Middle French metaphore (Old French metafore, 13th century), and directly from Latin metaphora, from Greek metaphoraa transfer,” especially of the sense of one word to a different word, literally “a carrying over,” from metaphereintransfer, carry over; change, alter; to use a word in a strange sense,” from meta-over, across” (+ phereinto carry, bear” (related to infer)

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Into the darkness they go, the wise and the lovely. ”

Edna St. Vincent Millay (1892-1950, poet and playwright, awarded the Pulitzer Prize for her 1923 volume of poems entitled, “The Ballad of the Harp-Weaver”)

Bio Source:

www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/edna-st-vincent-millay

“Man is born broken. He lives by mending. The grace of God is glue.”

Anne Lamott (b. 1954, American novelist and non-fiction writer, progressive political activist, public speaker, and writing teacher)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anne_Lamott

“‘Life' wrote a friend of mine, 'is a public performance on the violin, in which you must learn the instrument as you go along.’”

E.M. Forster (1879-1970, Edward Morgan Forster, British novelist, essayist, social and literary critic; best known for “Howards End” and “Passage to India”)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/E-M-Forster

“Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor.”

Truman Capote (1924-1984, Truman Garcia Capote, trailblazing writing of Southern descent, best known for “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” and “In Cold Blood,” the original true-crime novel)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/truman-capote-9237547

“Happiness is the china shop; love is the bull.”

H.L. Mencken (1880-1956, German-American journalist, satirist, cultural critic and scholar, known as the “Sage of Baltimore”)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/H._L._Mencken

“She's the kind of girl who climbed the ladder of success wrong by wrong.”

Mae West (1893-1980, theater actress, film actress, and pin-up; known for her blunt sexuality and steamy settings)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/mae-west-9528264

“The psychotic drowns in the same waters in which the mystic swims with delight.”

Joseph Campbell (1904-1987, mythologist, writer, editor, scholar, teacher, and lecturer, whose work on comparative mythology and folklore examined the universality of recurring myths in human culture)

Bio Source:

billmoyers.com/guest/joseph-campbell/

“They are trying to make me into a fixed star. I am an irregular planet.”

Martin Luther (1483-1546, German theologian who forever changed Christianity and began the Protestant Reformation movement in 16th century Europe)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/martin-luther-9389283

Meditation

“Failure is the condiment that gives success its flavor.”

— Truman Capote

We all go through these cycles of success and failure, which are integral parts of our lives.  Our failures, in particular, when we are in the right mind-set, can punctuate our desires to recover and succeed, especially when we accept our circumstances, no matter how grim.  We can then climb out of our metaphorical whirlpools and sinkholes of negative thinking and circular reasoning.

As Shawn Achor coined in his book, The Happiness Advantage – The Seven Principles of Positive Psychology That Fuel Success and Performance at Work, the “Third Path,” which is a creative roadway to grow and bounce forward.

Every one of us wants to thrive, to flourish, and to live out our truest potentials. But, we cannot do this unless we put the work into living joyous lives.  Rest assured, our journeys will sometimes be challenging.  But what matters is that we give it every effort as long, as we are inhabitants on this magnificent planet, to blossom in freedom and peace.

So, are you curious to know what I would choose as my own personal failure condiment to give my successes flavor?  Lime and garlic marinated for days on pork roast (my big fat successes), also called “pernil,” cooked the way our Puerto Rican mothers and fathers do for special occasions like Christmas, celebrating boatloads of ever evolving successes.

Stay excited and curious, sojourners!

Much Love, Tonya

 

 

 

 

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *