Humble

1: not proud of haughty; not arrogant or assertive
2: reflecting, expressing, or offered in a spirit of deference or submission
3 (a): ranking low in a hierarchy or scale: insignificant, unpretentious; (b): not costly or luxurious

 

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Humble (adj.): late 13th century, of persons, “submissive, respectful, lowly in manner, modest, not self-asserting, obedient,” from Old French humble, umble, earlier umele, from Latin humilislowly,” literally “on the ground,” from humusearth,” from Proto-Indo-European root dhghem-earth” (related to chthonic). From late 14th century, of things, “lowly in kind, state, condition, or amount,” also “of low birth or rank.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“The humblest tasks get beautified if loving hands do them.”

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888, American author and poet who wrote the classic novel, “Little Women,” as well as various works under pseudonyms. Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson were family friends.)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/louisa-may-alcott-9179520#synopsis

“The seeker after truth should be humbler than the dust. The world crushes the dust under its feet, but the seeker after truth should so humble himself that even the dust could crush him. Only then, and not till then, will he have a glimpse of truth.”

Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948, Mohandas Karamchand Gandi, known by the Mahatha, which meant “Great Soul.” He was a lawyer, politician, social activist, writer and the leader of the nationalist movement against the British rule of India.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Mohandas-Karamchand-Gandhi

“Sit down before fact as a little child, be prepared to give up every preconceived notion, follow humbly wherever and to whatever abysses nature leads, or you shall learn nothing. I have only begun to learn content and peace of mind since I have resolved at all risks to do this.”

Thomas Henry Huxley (1825-1895, English biologist, educator, and advocate of agnosticism (he coined the word); and also known as “Darwin’s Bulldog” for his advocacy of Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Thomas-Henry-Huxley

“It's okay to disagree with the thoughts or opinions expressed by other people. That doesn't give you the right to deny any sense they might make. Nor does it give you a right to accuse someone of poorly expressing their beliefs just because you don't like what they are saying. Learn to recognize good writing when you read it, even if it means overcoming your pride and opening your mind beyond what is comfortable.”

Ashly Lorenzana (author, poet, and writer, best known for “Sex, Drugs & Being an Escort,” her first published work.)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/4463656.Ashly_Lorenzana

“I like the scientific spirit—the holding off, the being sure but not too sure, the willingness to surrender ideas when the evidence is against them: this is ultimately fine—it always keeps the way beyond open—always gives life, thought, affection, the whole man, a chance to try over again after a mistake—after a wrong guess.”

Walt Whitman (1819-1892, “Walt Whitman is America’s world poet – a latter-day successor to Homer, Virgil, Dante, and Shakespeare. In Leaves of Grass (1855), he celebrated democracy, nature, love, and friendship. This monumental work chanted praises to the body as well as to the soul, and found beauty and reassurance even in death.”)

Bio Source:

www.poetryfoundation.org/poems-and-poets/poets/detail/walt-whitman

Meditation

“The seeker after truth should be humbler than the dust. The world crushes the dust under its feet, but the seeker after truth should so humble himself that even the dust could crush him. Only then, and not till then, will he have a glimpse of truth.”

— Mahatma Gandhi

It’s in the emptying of our bodies, minds, and spirits where we can glimpse the potential of our souls, who we are created to be and what our world can truly offer.

It’s not easy to humble our selves to such an extent.  We have to literally pray and contemplate our selves through such spiritual transformations.  Actually, it’s gut wrenching to transmute to such an extent, from the inside out and from head to toes.

That’s why most people resist and would rather fight to stay where they are, even if that state of existence is killing them slowly.   Most of us do not have the courage to face one’s sins and addictions and then to battle and love these our enemies (ourselves) through.  It takes a great deal of audacity to risk one’s life for promises of bright futures.

But, if we could band together as a great human family and be there for each other when it counted the most, then maybe we all could succeed, no matter what stage of consciousness we individually abide.

There’s much being made in the news about the “Dominguez Super Six,” young women from Dominguez High School in Compton California, who all graduated with high honors.  All six girls, from hard-working immigrant families, made a pack with each other while in middle school that no one would fail and that all would succeed.  With the coverings of their families, teachers, and guidance counselors, they all did.  Two graduated as valedictorians and four as salutatorians, and all have been accepted to prestigious colleges.

Wouldn’t it be amazing if we could give that same commitment to each other, even as we evolved, descended, and ascended personally?  We could then reach back for each and give each other a hand when we needed the support the most.  Wouldn’t this world evolve and create exponentially in love!

Miraculously Yours, Tonya

Discussion

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