Full, Fulfill

Full (Adjective)
 : containing as much or as many as is possible
: not lacking in any essential : Perfect
Fulfill (verb)
: to do what is required by (something, such as a promise or a contract)
: to succeed in doing or providing (something)
: to succeed in achieving (something) : to make (something) true or real

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Full (adj.): Old English fullcontaining all that can be received; having eaten or drunk to repletion; filled; perfect, entire, utter,” from pele – “to fill” (Related to Poly-).

Fulfill (v.): Old English fullfyllanfill up” (a room, a ship, etc.), “make full; take the place of (something),” from full,  a sense of “completion” + fyllan, which is ultimately the same room. Used from the mid-13 century in reference to prophecy. From mid-13th century as “do, perform; carry out, consummate, carry into effect;” from c. 1300 as “complete, finish; satiate, satisfy, gratify.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“How beautiful the leaves grow old. How full of light and color are their last days.”

John Burroughs (1837-1921, American nature essayist, naturalist, and activist in the U.S. conversation movement; close friends with Walt Whitman)

Bio Source:

www.whitmanarchive.org:8080/criticism/disciples/burroughs/biography/anc.00250.html

“And now we welcome the new year. Full of things that have been.”

Rainer Maria Rilke (1875-1926, Boheman-Austrian poet and novelist; and one the most lyrically intense German-language poets)

Bio Source:

www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/rainer-maria-rilke

“We live in a wonderful world that is full of beauty, charm and adventure. There is no end to the adventures that we have if only we seek them with our eyes open.”

Jawaharial Nehru (1889-1964, first prime minister of India and a central figure in Indian politics before and after independence from England)

Bio Source:

www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/nehru_jawaharlal.shtml

“Life is full of beauty. Notice it. Notice the bumble bee, the small child, and the smiling faces. Smell the rain, and feel the wind. Live your life to the fullest potential, and fight for your dreams.”

Ashley Smith (b. 1978, American author, speaker, and hostage victim; wrote the book, Unlikely Angel – The Untold story of Atlanta’s Hostage Hero)

Bio Source:

www.ashleysmithrobinson.com/bio-encore/

“True happiness involves the full use of one’s power and talents.”

John W. Gardner (1912-2002, Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare under President Lyndon Johnson)

Bio Source:

www.nytimes.com/2002/02/18/us/john-w-gardner-89-founder-of-common-cause-and-adviser-to-presidents-dies.html?pagewanted=all

“Perhaps home is not a place but simply an irrevocable condition.”

James Baldwin (1924-1987, American writer, novelist, essayist, playwright, poet, and social critic.)

Bio Source:

www.pbs.org/wnet/americanmasters/james-baldwin-about-the-author/59/

“I cannot even imagine where I would be today were it not for that handful of friends who have given me a heart full of joy. Let’s face it, friends make life a lot more fun.”

Charles R. Swindoll (b. 1934, evangelical Christian pastor, author, educator, and radio preacher)

Bio Source:

www.insight.org/about/chuck-swindoll

When we give freely, we feel full and complete; when we withhold, we feel small, petty, impotent, and lacking. We are meant to learn this great truth, that giving fulfills us, while withholding and trying to get causes us to feel empty and even more needy. This truth runs counter to our programming, which drives us to try to get something from others to fulfill our neediness, only to end up even more needy, grasping, lacking, and unfulfilled.”

Gina Lake (author of such books as: From Stress to Stillness, Trusting Life, Radical Happiness, Embracing the Now, Choosing Love, A Heroic Life, and The Jesus Trilogy…)

Bio Source:

Source: www.radicalhappiness.com/contact-about/about-gina-lake

Meditation

“I think instead [of happiness] we should be working for contentment… an inner sense of fulfillment that’s relatively independent of external circumstances.” — Andrew Weil

I had to take a good long walk, yesterday morning, after seeing the news and the massacre in San Bernardino, California.  My heart was full and I needed to move and circulate my body’s energy so I could continue to connect into Mind of God.

I am fortunate to live in a part of the country where I have easy access to the natural wonders of this world. Once I step outside I can walk through an invisible veil where I can feel the nourishing and charged ion particles pouring down from the Divine.

It mattered not that the sky was gray and the sun was temporary blocked.  What’s important is my sensuous connection to the natural elements, the wind’s gentle massages providing clean breathable air; an audible meal consisting of a cacophony of bird songs; and the visual delights of design from the animal, tree, and plant kingdoms.

On this journey there were other folks moving about seemingly with the same idea, slowly riding their bikes and walking in contemplation and prayer.  As we pass we other we are all conscious enough to raise our bowed heads and then nod or wave.

Dr. Weil is right.  A meaningful life is all about freedom, independence, and cultivating a rich interior,  content and at peace in believing, knowing, and trusting that all is well and will be well.

Continue to walk in faith, my friends, and remain relentless in expanding your love.

As Always With Love, Tonya

Discussion

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *