Fame

1 (a): public estimation: reputation; (b): popular acclaim: renown
archaic: rumor

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Fame (n.): early 13th century, “character attributed to someone;” late 13th century, “celebrity, renown,” from Old French fame “fame, reputation, renown, rumor” (12th century), from Latin fama “talk, rumor, report; reputation, public opinion; renown, good reputation,” but also “ill-fame, scandal, reproach,” from Proto-Indo-European root bha- “to speak, tell, say.”

The goddess Fama was the personification of rumor in Roman mythology.  The Latin derivative fabulare was the colloquial word for “speak, talk” since the time of Plautus, whence Spanish hablar.

Source: etymonline.com

Wisdom

“I'm an instant star, just add water.” 

David Bowie (b. David Robert Jones, 1947 – 2016, English singer, songwriter and actor)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bowie

“I've been imitated so well I've heard people copy my mistakes.” 

Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970, one of the most influential musicians in the 20th century, pioneered possibilities in the electric guitar)

Bio Source:

www.jimihendrix.com

“The biggest challenge after success is shutting up about it.” 

Criss Jami (b. Christopher James Gilbert in 1987, author, musician for the metal band Crimson Gryphon, also a poet, essayist, existentialist philosopher, and the founder and designer of Killosopher Apparel)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/4860176.Criss_Jami

Fame means millions of people have the wrong idea of who you are.” 

Erica Jong (b. 1942, novelist, poet, and essayist, consistently known for using her craft to help provide women with a powerful and rational voice in forging a feminist consciousness; published 21 books, including eight novels, six volumes of poetry, six books of non-fiction and numerous articles in magazines and newspapers)

Bio Source:

www.goodreads.com/author/show/6085.Erica_Jong

"Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful." 

John Wooden (1910 – 2010, American basketball player and head coach at the UCLA; nicknamed the "Wizard of Westwood,"; won ten NCAA national championships in a 12-year period as head coach, including a record seven in a row)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Wooden

Meditation

“Talent is God given. Be humble. Fame is man-given. Be grateful. Conceit is self-given. Be careful.”

John Wooden

 

It’s taken me a bit to get my thoughts together, and to reconcile the troubling events from the last two weeks.  I’ve been very disturbed by the murderous events here in our homeland and abroad, and has caused me have some flashbacks.

Setting out into adulthood I never fathom when I would step over some invisible line into territories where hate and fear existed.

Two weeks after I gave birth to my son, I and my husband at the time went to see the movie, “Ghost,” starring Patrick Swayze and Whoopie Goldberg.  Since my son was in the loving hands of his grandmother we wanted to take our time going back home.  Instead of taking the train we waited to take the bus.  It was the late 1980s and before the use of cell phones.

While waiting in a quiet Upper Westside neighborhood at a bus on Riverside Drive, a van stopped across the street from us.  The driver, who happened to be an older white man with long hair and a beard watched us for a good 30 seconds.  Acutely alert, we looked back until the van eventually moved on.  To our surprised when stopped about 25 feet up the street, when the back doors swung opened, and out stepped about 6 cleaned-cut preppy young man with bats.  These young men walked over to the bench and ferociously hit an elderly black homeless man who was sleeping on bench.  That poor man ran out the middle of the street, screaming.

What was so horrifying was not only the heinous act, but the cold and ruthless spirit in which these young men committed the act.

Do we want to be famous for noble deeds, or infamous for destructive or murderous acts?  When we are indoctrinated in hate and fear, our egocentric motives are dangerous, not only to others but also to ourselves.

As the legendary civil rights activist and Baptist preacher Ruby Sales wisely stated, there are two types of rage, redemptive and un-redemptive.  Redemptive rage is steeped in love, humility and consciousness, its aim to evolutionize and transform.  However, un-redemptive rage cements our hearts in hate, divisiveness, and malignancy, feeding our delusions of darker worlds.

Stay clear, centered, and hopeful, sojourners!

Faithfully Yours, Tonya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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