Coach

: a person who teaches and trains an athlete or performer
: a person who teaches and trains the members of a sports team and makes decisions about how the team plays during games
: a private teacher who gives someone lessons in a particular subject

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Coach (n.): 1550s, “large kind of carriage,” from Middle French coche (16c.), from German kotsche, from Hungarian kocsi (szekér)(carriage) of Kocs,” village where it was first made. In Hungary, the thing and the name for it date from 15th century, and forms are found in most European languages. Applied to railway cars 1866, American English. Sense of “economy or tourist class” is from 1949. Meaning “instructor/trainer” is circa 1830 Oxford University slang for a tutor who “carries” a student through an exam; athletic sense is 1861.

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Listening is such a simple act. It requires us to be present, and that takes practice, but we don’t have to do anything else. We don’t have to advise, or coach, or sound wise. We just have to be willing to sit there and listen.”

Margaret J. Wheatley (b. 1944, American writer, consultant, speaker, educator, and teacher)

Bio Source:

margaretwheatley.com/bio/

“A person will know the quality of your listening by the backtrack or question that follows.”

Tony Husted (professional certified coach with the International Coach Federation and trainer with Erickson College International)

Bio Source:

tonyhusted.com/about-tony/

“The job of an educator is to teach students to see vitality in themselves”

Joseph Campbell (1904-1987, American mythologist, writer, lecturer; best known for his work in comparative mythology and comparative religion)

Bio Source:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joseph_Campbell

“Teach them the quiet words of kindness, to live beyond themselves. Urge them toward excellence, drive them toward gentleness, pull them deep into yourself, pull them upward toward manhood, but softly like an angel arranging clouds. Let your spirit move through them softly.”

Pat Conroy (1945-2015, New York Times bestselling American author who wrote several acclaimed novels and memoirs, that included “The Prince of Tides” and “The Great Santini,” both of which were made into Oscar-nominated films.)

Bio Source:

www.nytimes.com/2016/03/05/books/pat-conroy-who-wove-his-family-strife-into-novels-of-carolina-dies-at-70.html

“Being in politics is like being a football coach. You have to be smart enough to understand the game, and dumb enough to think it’s important.”

Eugene McCarthy (1916-2005, U.S. senator, whose entry into the 1968 race for the Democratic presidential nomination led President Lyndon B. Johnson to drop his bid for reelection.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Eugene-J-McCarthy

“Every leader is different. Every bench is different. Every business is different. So while the complexities change, the work of coaching stays the same keep your clients at the center of the work, push them to use their strengths more and to temper their weaknesses, and illuminate blind spots because these are what really get in the way.”

Stacey Feiner (family business consultant, who brings psychological strategies to business owners; also the author of the “Talent Mindset”)

Bio Source:

www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=stacy+feiner

“Great Leaders develop through a never ending process of self-study, self-reflection, education, training, and experience”

Tony Buon (b. 1960, British workplace psychologist, speaker, mediator, and author; also managing partner of Buon Consultancy based in London)

Bio Source:

www.buon.net/tonybuon.html

Meditation

“Listening is such a simple act. It requires us to be present, and that takes practice, but we don’t have to do anything else. We don’t have to advise, or coach, or sound wise. We just have to be willing to sit there and listen.”

— Margaret J. Wheatley

Active listening takes a lot of practice, but it’s an extremely important part of coaching and collaborating around a person’s life.

Listening allows us to carry another on a stream of consciousness, while the one who is voices their concerns can process his/her own questions and answers.

Listening is an act of Divine Witnessing, when one gets to observe another through the Eyes of Infinite Love.  To do so, one must abide in a opened heart, one full of grace, mercy, and deep compassion.

It’s the act of mirroring back to that person what one sees, letting go of all preconceived notions and biases.

We can never know what another has gone through unless we allow that person to tell her/his story.  Until then, we will know very little, if anything at all.

Dwelling in presence give us the capabilities, not only to listen, but to observe our inner and exterior worlds, simultaneously.

That’s why meditation, in whatever form we choose, either transcendental, walking, running, yoga, or any other sacred modality is important, because it allows us to reorder our minds and build strong spiritual structures for now and for the future.

Stay well, my friends, and have a long celebratory day.

Much Love, Tonya

 

 

 

 

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