Abide, Bide

Abide
: to accept or bear (someone or something bad, unpleasant, etc.)
: to stay or live somewhere
: to remain or continue
 Bide : to wait for : withstand : to put up with : tolerate

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Abide (v.)  12th century, Old English abidan, gebidan, denoting onward motion: a + bidan remain, wait, dwell.”

Bide (v.): 12th century, Middle English, from Old English bidanto stay, continue, live, remain and to wait;” akin to Old High German bitanto await,” Latin fidereto trust,” Greek peithesthaito believe.”

 

 

 

Source: www.merriam-webster.comSource: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“In great deeds something abides.”

Joseph Chamberlain (1836-1914, British businessman, social reformer, radical politician, and ardent imperialist.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Joseph-Chamberlain

“There’s no abiding success without commitment.”

Tony Robbins (b. 1960, age 55, an American motivational speaker, personal finance instructor, life coach, and self-help author.)

Bio Source:

www.ted.com/speakers/tony_robbins

“Amidst the confusion of the times, the conflicts of conscience, and the turmoil of daily living, an abiding faith becomes an anchor to our lives.”

Thomas S. Monson (b. 1927, age 88, Religious leader, author, and the sixteenth and current president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.)

Bio Source:

www.thomassmonson.org/

“The whole earth is the tomb of heroic men and their story is not given only on stone over their clay but abides everywhere without visible symbol woven into the stuff of other men’s lives.”

Pericles (495 BC – 429 BC, Greek statesman, general, orator, patron of the arts and politician during the so-called golden age of Athenian culture.)

Bio Source:

www.history.com/topics/ancient-history/pericles

"No problem can withstand the assault of sustained thinking."

Voltaire (Francois-Marie Arouet, 1694-1778, considered one of France’s greatest Enlightenment writers and was known for the satirical novella, “Candide.” He was also an historian and philosopher.)

Bio Source:

www.biography.com/people/voltaire-9520178

"Physical strength can never permanently withstand the impact of spiritual force."

Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882-1945, 32nd President of the United states, a statesman and political leader who helped the American people regain faith in themselves.)

Bio Source:

www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/franklindroosevelt

"True friendship is a plant of slow growth, and must undergo and withstand the shocks of adversity, before it is entitled to the appellation."

George Washington (1732-1799, 1st U.S. President, the Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States.)

Bio Source:

www.whitehouse.gov/1600/presidents/georgewashington

"Fortune blinds men when she does not wish them to withstand the violence of her onslaughts."

Livy (Titus Livius Patavinus, 59 BC – 17 AD, along with Sallust and Tacitus, Livy is one of the three greatest Roman historians, who wrote a monumental history of Rome and the Roman people.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Livy

“True love is not a strong fiery, impetuous passion. It is, on the contrary, an element calm and deep. It looks beyond mere externals, and is attracted by qualities alone. It is wise and discriminating and its devotion is real and abiding.”

Ellen G. White (1827-1915, prolific author and an American Christian pioneer.)

Bio Source:

www.whiteestate.org/about/egwbio.asp

Meditation

I heard the word, Abide by, around the times and challenges of the 911 terrorist attacks.

I didn’t quite know what that word meant. A spiritual teacher first offered, “abide by” when advising those who were affected by the tragedies from a distance, and not those of us who were actually living through it.

I couldn’t wrap my mind around its meaning, maybe because I was going through a great deal at the time.   My life at that time was so much about survival and not about a thriving life.  But, I love words and always want to know their multi-dimensional meanings from their roots on up.

My question is simple: Abide by or in what?

It appeared to me that there were some words missing.  Shall we, for instance, abide in love, courage, strength, patience, and the belief that there were better days coming, and that in the end this world will be a better place?

Now, that we are here birthing a New Earth and coming through so many man-made catastrophes and natural occurrences, do we not abide in faith and begin to walk some of our talk?

Over the weekend I’ve been watching the news reports on Pope Francis’ upcoming visits to Cuba and the U.S.  I am not Catholic, but I love this Pope very much.  I get so verklempt when The Pope blesses and comforts those who are challenged by physical disabilities and suffering.

On Sunday’s news program, “Sixty Minutes,” The Pope told one of his aids that he senses when someone is in need.  I am fascinated that he trusts his intuition and spiritual interior that implicitly.  The Pope also told Sixty Minutes that he refuses to fret over his security and that God will take care of him, but he also insists in asking for our prayers.

I am also beginning to understand why The Pope is referred to as the “Holy See.” He is a great example for all of us, no matter what our individual belief systems.

May you all abide in love, courage, strength and peace, today and always my friends!

Many Blessings, Tonya

Discussion

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