Adventure

: an undertaking usually involving danger and unknown risks
: an exciting or remarkable experience
: an enterprise involving financial risk

Source: www.merriam-webster.com

Etymology

Adventure (n.): c. 1200, auenturethat which happens by chance, fortune, luck,” from Old French aventure (11c.) “chance, accident, occurrence, event, happening,” from Latin adventura(a thing) about to happen,” from adventurus, future particle of advenireto come to, reach, arrive at,” from ad- “to” + venire “to come.”

Source: www.etymonline.com

Wisdom

“Let us step into the night and pursue that flighty temptress, adventure.”

J.K. Rowling (b. Joanne “Jo” Rowling in 1965, age 50, pen names J.K. Rowling and Robert Galbraith, British novelist, best known for Harry Potter series)

Bio Source:

www.jkrowling.com/en_US/

“Never fear quarrels, but seek hazardous adventures.”

Alexandre Dumas (1802-1870, author, journalist, playwright; one of the most widely read French writer whose works were translated into nearly 100 languages; best known for The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo; his grandmother was a former Haitian slave.)

Bio Source:

www.britannica.com/biography/Alexandre-Dumas-pere

Adventure is not outside man; it is within.”

George Eliot (1819-1880, George Eliot was the pen name of Mary Ann Evans, an English novelist, journalist, translator, and one of the leading writers of the Victorian era. Her novel Middlemarch was celebrated for their realism and psychological insights.)

Bio Source:

www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/eliot_george.shtml

“Would you tell me, please, which way I ought to go from here?"
"That depends a good deal on where you want to get to."
"I don't much care where –"
"Then it doesn't matter which way you go.”

Lewis Carroll (1832-1898, Lewis Carroll was the pen name of Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, an English writer, mathematician, logician, Anglican deacon, and photographer.)

Bio Source:

www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/lewis-carrolls-shifting-reputation-9432378/?no-ist=&page=1

“I know not all that may be coming, but be it what it will, I'll go to it laughing.”

Herman Melville (1819-1891, American novelist, short story writer, and poet from the American Renaissance period; best known for writing Moby Dick, or the Whale; and a close friend of writer, Nathaniel Hawthore)

Bio Source:

www.poets.org/poetsorg/poet/herman-melville

“A day wasted on others is not wasted on one's self.”

Charles Dickens (1812-1870, an English quintessential Victorian writer and social critic, best known for A Tale of Two Cities, David Copperfield, Great Expectations, A Christmas Carol)

Bio Source:

www.bbc.co.uk/history/historic_figures/dickens_charles.shtml

“Life is a blank canvas, and you need to throw all the paint on it you can.”

Danny Kaye (1911-1987, American actor, singer, dancer, and comedian)

Bio Source:

dannykaye.com/bio

“What is real and what is not is for your heart to decide and for your heart to know.”

Colleen Houck (b. 1969, age 45, author of the novel, Tiger’s Destiny)

Bio Source:

colleenhouck.com/

“Love, like everything else in life, should be a discovery, an adventure, and like most adventures, you don’t know you’re having one until you’re right in the middle of it.”

E.A. Bucchianeri (Author)

Bio Source:

www.eabucchianeri.netau.net/index.htm

“To fall in love with God is the greatest romance; to seek him the greatest adventure; to find him, the greatest human achievement.”

Augustine of Hippo (354 AD – 430 AD, also known as Saint Augustine or Saint Austin, and sometimes as Blessed Augustine in the Eastern Orthodox Church, was an early Christian theologian and philosopher.)

Bio Source:

www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=418

Meditation

Loving is the Great Adventure, the Big Risk.  Isn’t that why we are here in the first place, to experience our unique connections and to discover what we are made of?

Life can pummel us sometimes, and we can become squeamish and tentative in life’s adventures, especially when it comes to the extreme sport of love.  I’m not just talking about romantic love.  I’m talking about every level of love, from the care of our planet, our children, our elders, our family, friends, and neighbors, animals, and most importantly loving ourselves.

When did we get so trepidatious in loving?  How did we get so gullible to believe the lies that others told us, mainly that we are not worthy of great love.  This human conditioning is part our dark programming, to distract us from our uniqueness and to be carbon copies of everyone else.

Remember when we were children? We fearlessly loved and courageously expressed our emotions, raw and authentic?  We loved who and what we loved, and we didn’t care about the opinions of others.  We loved unconditionally with little concern of being loved back.  We had total confidence we were loved and could love and create.

I remember loving that way when I was five years old.  I had a crush on Tony.  He was a soldier in the Vietnam and a very tall and handsome man in his early twenties like my father.  Tony and his family belong to the same church my parents did.

Because Tony was an army soldier it was a surprise when he would showed up at church in between tours.  One Sunday, Tony stepped inside to the main sanctuary as he talked with my father.  I was sitting with my mother, and perked up when I heard his voice, having the ability to effortlessly tune into him.

I don’t remember how I climbed over my mother.  All I remember was my mother being quick in grabbing and holding on to the bow of my ruffled blue dress as my legs kept running in place.  My mother and the other churchwomen were amused of how determined I was to reach him.  I knew eventually my mother would let me go, and when she did I flew and jumped into Tony’s arms as he caught me placing me high on his shoulders.

I was in love with Tony.  It didn’t matter if I was 5 years old and he was 22.  And it didn’t matter how my parents and Tony thought it was cute that I had big crush on him.  What matter was the exhilaration and the delight in feeling that love, and those feelings only enhanced when Tony told me, in front of my parents, that once I reached 18 he would marry me.  I took him literally, of course.

I never saw Tony much after that.  But, as the years passed, especially as I approached the age of 18, I asked my father whatever happened to Tony, and my father told me that he had been killed in Vietnam.  My heart broke on so many levels.  But, I will never forget all the love that Tony has inspired in me.  And I am always striving to love with that abandoned pure heart.

I get a little bit tentative sometimes before I plunge into Love’s Infinite Sea of The Unknown.  But my desire remains strong in loving unconditionally.

Wouldn’t it be spectacular if we all developed the courage and freedom to do to so, to live our lives as joyous, spontaneous, and awe-inspiring adventures.

Much Love, Tonya

Discussion

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